9 Best Free Movies On YouTube

9 Best Free Movies On YouTube


YouTube is branching out as a streaming service. You can rent or purchase films directly through
the site for a small fee, but now, they’re setting themselves apart from the pack by
releasing almost 100 films for free, well, free with ad breaks, at least. Here are some of the best free movies YouTube
has to offer. 2014’s Very Good Girls certainly has all the
marks of a prestige indie film. Its cast includes Demi Moore, Ellen Barkin,
Richard Dreyfuss and Peter Sarsgaard alongside stars Dakota Fanning and Elizabeth Olsen. You may recognize her as the younger sibling
of the Olsen twins, who has since made a name for herself as Scarlet Witch in the Marvel
Cinematic Universe. The film tells the story of two young women,
Lily and Gerri, who fall for the same boy, David, played by Boyd Holbrook, during their
last summer before college. Both girls have to weather personal strife
that goes beyond typical teenage girl drama, complicated by the fact that David is more
interested in Lily, creating a rift between the two friends. The film wasn’t exactly a hit with critics,
but it was praised for its sharp writing and excellent performances. If you haven’t heard of it, it’s worth a watch,
and anyone who struggled through their teenage years will absolutely find a moment or two
that are incredibly, sometimes painfully relatable. This 2011 documentary by director David Gelb
focuses on Jiro Ono, an 85-year-old master chef and the proprietor of Sukiyabashi Jiro,
an extremely unique Michelin-starred sushi restaurant in Tokyo. The legendary restaurant only offers a 20-course
fixed menu of dishes that cost at least 30,000 Japanese yen, or just under 300 US dollars. The restaurant also has only ten seats, and
is located, oddly enough, inside of a subway station. The movie also shines a light on Ono’s children,
who each follow their father’s footsteps in their own ways. Takashi, Jiro’s younger son, left the nest
to open a restaurant of his own elsewhere in Japan. His older brother, Yoshikazu, considers himself
duty-bound to take over Sukiyabashi Jiro one day, and is shown still working alongside
their father. Originally, Gelb was going to make a documentary
about sushi culture in general, but after eating at Jiro’s restaurant, he was struck
by the chef’s artistry, commitment, and focus, not to mention his incredible sushi. He then decided to focus exclusively on Jiro
instead. You don’t need to be a foodie to enjoy the
movie, either. The film has been met with near-universal
critical acclaim. It was even parodied by Fred Armisen on his
series Documentary Now, on which Armisen learns how to make the perfect grain of rice from
his father, a no-nonsense chef. Some have described Jiro Dreams of Sushi as
a perfect antidote to today’s haphazard and hectic culture, in that watching a master
of his craft perfect his techniques through constant, patient practice may inspire viewers
to stop chasing the next big thing and learn to focus. The late, great Stan Lee was more than just
a comic book writer, he was a self-made superhero and a legend unto himself. After his passing at the age of 95 in 2018,
there’s no better time to watch With Great Power: The Stan Lee Story, which chronicles
everything from his childhood to the creation of seminal characters like the Hulk, Spider-Man,
and the X-Men. Lee’s life was so long and storied that many
may have forgotten how many things he lived through and accomplished. As a younger man, he served in World War II. When he returned home and got into the comics
industry in the 1950s, he engaged in a hard-fought battle to prevent comic books from being censored. The documentary wisely lets Lee speak for
himself through most of its 80-minute runtime, telling stories about his humble beginnings. A particularly moving anecdote reveals that
he once came close to quitting comics altogether until his wife, Joan, convinced him to write
what he really wanted to write about, which resulted in the creation of the Fantastic
Four. No documentary on Stan Lee would be complete
without plenty of Marvel stars and celebrities to talk about his influence, and a wealth
of famous faces appear, from Tobey Maguire and Samuel L. Jackson to Paris Hilton and
Ringo Starr. This film serves as the perfect ode to an
icon and shows that he was still, at his core, relatable and accessible, even as perhaps
the most influential man in comic book history. “You know, I guess one person can make a difference.” An ambitious yet seriously low-budget science
fiction film from Ecuadorian director Sebastián Cordero, Europa Report features a few actors
you might recognize. The movie stars Embeth Davidtz, best known
for Schindler’s List and Matilda, as well as the late Michael Nyqvist, who appeared
in Mission: Impossible – Ghost Protocol, John Wick, and the Swedish Millennium series. The movie focuses on a group of astronauts
searching for life on Europa, one of Jupiter’s moons. Six months into the mission, the ship is suddenly
hit by a solar storm which leaves them unable to communicate with anyone on Earth. They then suffer a series of accidents before
eventually landing on Europa, discovering evidence that a single-celled organism exists
on the planet. Though they manage to restore their communications,
the crew never makes it back to Earth, leaving behind only a video that gets transmitted
back home. The making of the film was extremely faithful
to the realities of space travel and of Europa itself, the filmmakers used maps for accuracy,
and they used footage of space walks from the International Space Station and space
shuttle to correctly portray how a human might move within space. These tactics paid off when it came to critical
reception, among other positive reviews, space.com noted that the film was extraordinarily realistic,
and it was nominated for a Bradbury Award by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers
of America in 2013. Flawless features an all-star pair as its
two main cast members, Demi Moore and Michael Caine, both of whom shine in this creative
heist thriller. The film opens on Laura Quinn, who is being
interviewed for a relatively superficial piece about being the first woman to run the London
Diamond Corporation. But things take a turn when she suddenly places
an enormous diamond on the table in front of her and announces that she stole it. In a flashback to 1960, the film tells the
story of Quinn’s early days at the London Diamond Corporation, where she keeps losing
jobs to relatively unqualified men. Making things worse, she finds out from the
building’s janitor, Mr. Hobbs, that she’s not only not going to be promoted, but that
the higher-ups are planning to fire her. Together, they put together a plan to rob
the Corporation, but as with every good heist film, several twists and turns keep Quinn
and Hobbs from easily accomplishing their goals. At every fork in the road, the two are tracked
by Mr. Finch, a private investigator hired to look into their amateur heist. While the film earned lukewarm reviews from
critics at the time of its release, it’s still well worth a watch, featuring an engrossing
story with a number of sharp turns, as well as an excellent cast. This Oscar-nominated documentary about the
excesses of one Christian summer camp may seem, at first, that it’s choosing sides purely
by existing. But Rachel Grady and Heidi Ewing, the directors
of Jesus Camp, have assured viewers that they truly had no agenda during the making of their
film. According to the filmmakers, they always intended
the movie to simply be an accurate and honest representation of camps that aim to radicalize
Christian teenagers, indoctrinating them with a drive to take back the country in the name
of Jesus Christ. The film focuses on a camp based in North
Dakota called the Kids of Fire School of Ministry, turning an even narrower focus to three children
who attend, Levi, Rachael, and Tory. Switching between the camp itself and a prayer
conference in Missouri at Christ Triumphant Church, the film casts the camp’s leader,
Becky Fischer, in a dubious light. The movie includes tense scenes such as an
encounter between Fischer and conservative talk radio host Mike Papantonio, who questions
the camp leader’s choice to push extreme messages on young children. The film immediately stirred up controversy
by showing scenes where children were seemingly indoctrinated against, quote, “Muslim extremists,”
and told to become members of a so-called “army of God.” Many critics viewed the portrayal of evangelical
Christians as unflinching and sometimes disturbing, and Fischer eventually shut down the camp
amidst criticism of her teaching methods. She also cited concerns about vandalism in
the aftermath of the film when she closed the camp. Whenever a documentary incites that kind of
intense reaction, it’s usually worth a watch. Based on actual events, The World’s Fastest
Indian tells the story of Burt Munro, a real-life speed racer from Invercargill, New Zealand
who famously rode an Indian Scout motorcycle that he outfitted to his own specifications. Munro, as played by Anthony Hopkins, set a
high number of land speed records for motorcycles with engines under 1,000cc throughout the
1950s and 1960s. As the film tells us, he encountered a number
of hardships on this path to speed and glory. After irritating his neighbors at home in
New Zealand, he hops a cargo ship to the States. While he’s initially looked down upon by the
people of Los Angeles, he eventually succeeds thanks to a can-do attitude and pure friendliness. Overcoming the odds, he arrives at the Bonneville
Salt Flats, the real-life home of the Bonneville Speedway, and ends up breaking several records
before returning home to New Zealand as a hero. Though some criticized the movie for being
historically inaccurate, the film received praise from both audiences and critics. Infamous outlaw Butch Cassidy and his accomplice,
the Sundance Kid, have been profiled almost countless times in pop culture. One interpretation of the story is the movie
Blackthorn, starring lauded playwright and actor Sam Shepard as an aged Cassidy, hiding
out in South America under the name James Blackthorn. Shepard is joined by Nikolai-Coster Waldau
as a young Cassidy, who you may recognize as Jaime Lannister from Game of Thrones. The film follows Butch returning to the United
States after the death of another Wild Bunch accomplice, Etta Price. Along the way, he is attacked by a mysterious
Spaniard, and the two eventually team up for a robbery, leading to plenty of betrayals
and backstabbing along the way. The film received mixed reviews from critics,
undoubtedly suffering from comparisons to other depictions of Butch Cassidy in film. Critics wrote that while some parts of the
film worked splendidly, it fell victim to certain Western cliches. But while the film as a whole has some flaws,
Shepard’s performance was singled out for praise in a wide array of reviews, making
something special out of this character study of a legendary outlaw. A small independent film that made a fairly
big impression, Great World of Sound came out during the height of the reality TV phenomenon
in the late 2000s, when it seemed like anybody could become instantly famous, so long as
they had a little bit of skill and a whole lot of luck. Directed by Craig Zobel, this unorthodox pseudo-documentary
features Pat Healy as Martin and Kene Holliday as Clarence, two men undercover on an actual
audition circuit who convince strangers to perform for them in exchange for free recording
sessions and industry contacts. The people auditioning, tricked into thinking
the two actors were record industry executives, were for the most part entirely unaware that
the project was a film shoot, exposing themselves fully to the faux-documentarians. With a fictional throughline running alongside
real-life audition footage, the movie ultimately blurs fact and fiction, ending up being an
incredibly revealing look at the desire some have for fame and celebrity. Despite being hard to categorize, Great World
of Sound was well-received by critics. In his positive, three-star review, Roger
Ebert said the film was confident and well-designed, defying genre to make a memorable viewing
experience.

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  1. 7:00 I didn't know Mike Papantonio was a conservative, only met him through TYT, thus presumed he was Progressive, however I do not intend to say conservatives are banned from TYT or anything like that

  2. Yeah The Olsen twins where Mary Kate and Ashley Olsen, Elisabeth Olsen is related to them but not part of the Olsen twins. Even bigger fuck up its an anecdote not an antidote.

  3. I’ve watched Jesus Camp on a doc site. It was so disturbing and sad to see kids going through such torment. Child abuse came to mind. It was awful, but an eye opener of the indoctrination process.

  4. Enjoyed watching this, but it's "anecdote [a short and amusing or interesting story about a real incident or person]," not "antidote [a medicine taken or given to counteract a particular poison]." …Unless that's what you meant. 😀

  5. Europa Report is good IF you are NOT tech oriented.
    I couldn't get past "Ground Control" having every single screen in the room showing the EXACT same content as the Big screen at the front of the room, not one monitor was hooked up to the computer it was at, all of them were fed from ONE computer. Kinda impossible to get your work done when only ONE person in the room can use the "computers" while everyone else has no screen for their own tasks. Almost as if they were only there to stand around, look busy, and watch THE master work.

  6. Cant find 'em. Have they been deleted already? Maybe you meant you can watch the trailers for free. The full films are either not here or are pay-per-view. Or is this service not out yet, or maybe they cancelled it already. Anyone have the channel link?

  7. I’m not sure which is sadder… that this is what passes as “cinema” these days or that someone thought for one second these were the “best”. Talk about propaganda…….

  8. You know why I keep going back to Cinefix? The narrator(s). The guy reading this doesn't have the irritating voice most Looper narrators do, but "antidote" instead of "anecdote" should have triggered another take. Narrator missed it, editor missed it, producer missed it – because Looper doesn't care. Bye, again. Not because it's a big deal – but because it's just so typical.

  9. At 3:19 the narrator says "antidote" when he should've said "anecdote". I get that no one likes the spelling police but it just really bothers me lol

  10. Glad to hear that Jesus camp was shut down….it's weird how the Bible Belt runs through the worst educated parts of the country

  11. We all have a story to tell. If you want help telling you story in movie. Checkout this film community: @zollestudios

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