Human Show: 5 Questions for Natalie Pilling | Performante

Human Show: 5 Questions for Natalie Pilling | Performante


The best way’s to start with some warm-up questions such as: ‘What apps do you use on a daily basis?’, ‘How does your daily routine look like?’. It’s also very important at the beginning stage to tell that there are really no bad answers Actually, if you might be surprised how much valuable insights you can get from somebody saying: ‘I don’t know’ or ‘I don’t know how to use such a feature or such a way’. Also, avoid ‘yes/no’ answers. Asking open-ended questions is much much better. You don’t want to ask somebody: ‘Did you watch TV yesterday?’, but you will ask: ‘Would you describe your experience in watching TV?’. Generally speaking. You will get much more insight into the way that they interact with the TV rather than in a ‘yes/no’ answer. Additionally, you should never suggest a solution or an answer in a question. For instance: ‘Do you like watching TV?’ or ‘What do you like about watching TV?’ already suggests that the user likes watching TV. Avoid using technical terms. You’d be surprised how many people are afraid to admit that they didn’t understand your question, because they’re ashamed that they didn’t understand you. You do this in the first workshop or in the kickoff that you have with a client, where you sit down together with the team and refine or come up with a first version of a persona. How do you gather this knowledge at the same site? There’s a few ways to do that. Of course, user interviews, Secondary user research is definitely a second, a good way to do it as well. Expert interviews. Surveys, of course and analytics and data, especially when you have an existing product – you’re reviewing how users are behaving on your product as it is. Stakeholder introduce. This is very important because in the end you’re building a product for somebody out there, but you’re building it with somebody. Market research. Market research includes… …research of the industry, research of the competitors (both direct and indirect), competitive user testing. So you figured out what or who your competitors are, again, both direct and indirect, so you want to put your potential users, define your personas as we said before and you want to put them on using and testing your competitors’ products so that you can find out what works and what doesn’t work and what chances, what opportunities you have to do things better. User interviews. This is actually the most important point of your research and not being able to interview your users is significantly going to impact the quality of your research. So the visual design visual part is really the last step of the design process. First of all, before you start making the visual appearance of your product, you want to know what you’re building. You also want to know who you’re building your product for. The later you decide to do iterations on your product, more expensive it gets. Because changing a wireframe or a mock-up in the earlier stages of your process is much less expensive than changing the complete visual design of five, six, seven, eight, nine screens than you’ve designed. The best products are built iteratively. Building a product and releasing a product is never the last step in your process. You cannot put out your product into the world and the next step you’re gonna do is you’re gonna observe and then again, big-enough: analysis: summarize this information and you’re gonna create some assumptions and hypotheses and you’re going to test them and you’re going to implement them and you’re going to release them. Just like that. Practically speaking, one of the first things you’re going to do is to implement analytics on your product. This is very simple, but this is going to change your process later on, because this is going to give you insights qualitative and quantitative insights. Qualitative, for instance, with heat maps, through Hotjar quantitative, for instance, with Google Analytics. So I’m 100% sure that when one you’ve released your product you’re going to already know what you want to work on next and what to improve on. So the next step is getting back together with your team, planning ahead and picking up the work again.

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