Listen To Looch – ‘Show Me The Picture: The Story of Jim Marshall’

Listen To Looch – ‘Show Me The Picture: The Story of Jim Marshall’


Hey guys, it’s Looch, and I have a documentary
that I watched that I cannot recommend highly enough; it is so good. Now, I’m obsessed with
photographers; rock photographers. So when I heard about this documentary about the photographer
Jim Marshall, it’s called “Show Me The Picture: The Story of Jim Marshall,” and you’re thinking,
“Who’s Jim Marshall?” Who is Jim Marshall!?!
Think of any photograph basically from the ’60s to the ’80s of every huge band you can
think of. He started his career in San Francisco, in the Haight-Ashbury, so he was there for
all the hippie stuff. He was at Woodstock. He was there photographing Janis. Then he
kind of went into this jazz world, and he made friends with John Coltrane and Miles
Davis, who was notoriously very difficult to break through the outer shell. And Marshall
was great friends with these people. He speaks of the subjects he photographed with such
reverence in that he respected them so much, it sets his work apart. He wasn’t like paparazzi;
he was everywhere, but he became friends with these bands. Of course he was a nut job, too.
He had a great love for guns and cocaine, which is always a great combination, and he
spent a little time in jail. In fact, he was so kooky that they didn’t even put him in
real jail, because they knew he’d get completely eviscerated, so he actually spent time in
sort of a little offshoot of jail. But — I think he shot a neighbor. Who can’t relate
to that? But the word “iconic” is so overused, and
I get that, but when you think of Johnny Cash giving the finger — that’s Jim Marshall,
right there! He was there at San Quentin; he was there doing the Folsom Prison shot.
He did all the Grateful Dead, he did all of the hippie stuff. He also was the last photographer
to shoot the Beatles’ last concert ever. He was out there, had access to everything, and
you see him in the footage, he’s in the shot everywhere, but really not like a staged thing;
he’s just there capturing the exact moment. And some of the stuff that I honestly think
that was most fascinating to me was that Dennis Hopper admitted to having based his character
in “Apocalypse Now” on Jim Marshall. Can you think of that character right now? “He was
a kind man; he was a good man.” So the guy was a character. He was troubled. Troubled,
troubled, troubled. And they said that it was based on the fact that he was Syrian but
brought up Catholic. So the story is incredible. You don’t have
to love photographers, but honestly, the Jim Marshall story, documentary, is so worth it.
I believe it screened at SXSW to huge applause and great reviews, and so we’ll keep an eye
on when it becomes available for streaming because it is a must see.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *