MOVE Show Episode 2 : Move Me

MOVE Show Episode 2 : Move Me


(slow techno music)
(Audience clapping) – Hi, I’m Stephanie Bendixsen, Welcome to another episode of Move. Where we’re looking at the future of personal transportation. So hang about to find out
what’s going to move me. (slow techno music) In this episode, it’s all about me. You know how it is with us personalities, but by me what I actually mean is you. Hopefully that’s not too confusing, but how are us as individuals
going to move around? Things have changed in recent years, there was the Segway, of
course, which was supposed to revolutionize personal transportation but ended up being best known as a running gag on Arrested Development. In fact tech is less revolutionized the transport itself than
the way in which it’s used. Anyone can now make some
extra income by ride sharing, or on the other side of the
coin insure that their driver is gonna give them a five
star transport experience, or if they feel like having a whinge, about, well, a three star experience. Ride sharing also means
that non-drivers such as; the elderly, mobility
challenged or children have easier access to travel. And we can all appreciate
the ability to track safety and most of us really enjoy the mints. Can I ask why no one has started up a free mint taxi thing as an attempt to combat the “Uber-lution”?. Or will the future be smart shuttles? Driverless cars picking
you up from your door and then taking you
direct to your destination before popping off to
get the next customer. Your mints could be doing the driving! Or what about if there were virtual bus stops on every street
and buses would route themselves to the stops on demand? Imagine the brave new world where public transport came to the public. Depending on how you ride, it
seems everyone has an opinion on how you should ride, who
you should ride with and when. We hit the streets to ask. (upbeat music) – I live on the South Coast,
so we carpool into Sydney all of the time, it’s really handy and it saves heaps of money. – Any decent person, I wouldn’t mind. (laughs loudly) – James Rafferty, at first. – Obviously, with my
family because they work in the City too, so it would be easier. – Bruce Springsteen. – My Girlfriend. – Probably a Mother, such as myself, we’re going the same sort of
ways and doing the same things. (computer beeps and screeches) – Well we have with us two guests, who hail from two different
companies who help us understand the potential of mobility as a service now and in to the future. Please welcome Director
of Corporate Affairs for Multimodal Transport Company, Keolis Downer. Ségolène Deeley. (audience clapping) And also Head of Customer Success
for AI power data analyst, Hyper Anna. Anthony Slater. (audience clapping) So we’re seeing evolution
of a mobility as a service, or M.A.A.S, so what does that mean? – Yeah, absolutely. I think
people are moving away from this idea that transport
needs to be a fixed cost, where I own my own vehicle and
this vehicle needs to be able to take me from work as
well as on road trips, as well as when I’m
picking up all of my kids. So this idea that
mobility can be something that I subscribe to, that I
have a lot more options for so if I wanna take a vehicle for road trip I can get a large vehicle
to let me do that, if I’m just going to work and it’s only me I can take a small vehicle. A lot more flexibility
with the idea of mobility as a service it’s something
that can come and go from your life depending on what you need and when you need it rather
than a fixed cost investment. – Who are the kinds of
people that are using, Do we say MAAS? M.A.A.S, MAAS?
(Anthony laughs) – I dunno, well there’s
SAAS, Software as a service, there’s SAAS, you could say
MAAS, I dunno what do you think? – Yeah, I think you could say MAAS. – We could decide that right here, we can just go for that from now on. – Who are the kinds of
people who are using it? – All of us, I mean if anyone’s
gotten a Uber recently, or Taxify or Ola. That is one version of mobility as a service. – Yeah, I think the idea of
MAAS is really to provide a platform where all of your
mobility options are available so once you have that
anyone could use that, anyone that wants to use shared mobility services and public transports. You have access to all of your options through a single platform, eventually, and it encourages people out of their cars and to use more shared mobility services. – And Ségolène, where
do you see the future of transportation? Is it automated? – Yeah, I think to some
extent it’s already automated so you already have automated
Metros and automated trains are doing public transports
so, it will get more and more automated as we move forward, but I think that you’ll
still have more traditional public transport solutions as well. and it will probably be a balance
between on demand services that are at some extent
automated because they calculate the optimal route depending
on who’s traveling and how you can optimize the
shared itinerary of a vehicle and then mass transit options that carry more people to a given area. – And moving forward
with automated transport, do you think the focus will
be on personal transport or public or maybe somewhere in between? – I think it’s something in between, So we see certainly that there’s
a mix of private and public transport happening in the mobility space, but through digitalization
you are able to provide more of a personalized service
to people through their App. What you can imagine is that
people are able to customize their trip depending on
their mood of the day, or the weather or if they’re
wearing high heels potentially, and they have an itinerary
proposed to them through the different mobility
options that they have. – I think that idea of there only being sort of two extremes,
you’ve got public transport, so I’m on a bus with
50 people I don’t know and it’s on a set path or a train, or I drive a car or get a taxi. When there’s this middle
ground between this idea of, I can get in a car
with people I don’t know but there’s only three
or four of us traveling, we’re going to a similar destination so we have the efficient
use of private vehicles, the efficient use of smaller vehicles to sort of fill in those gaps, where mass public transport can’t reach. Even in a City like New
York with Millions of people and a really sophisticated
mass transport system, there’s still Millions
of cars coming in and out of New York City everyday. That’s because even their
mass public transport hasn’t solved that issue of getting to every single persons doorstep. And I think that some of these sort of hybrid options in
between, there’s ideas like; UberPOOL and there’s
other options out there, that can start to bridge that gap and bring transport to more people. – I suppose this has huge implications for people with limited mobility as well. (Ségolène and Anthony
both express agreement) – My nextdoor neighbor actually, I’ve noticed every time
I was leaving the house she would get a taxi
to take her somewhere, she can’t walk incredibly well, I had a conversation
with her about UberPOOL and she’s using that now to get places and it’s half the cost of
what it would be otherwise. So this idea of, like
I said, getting closer to peoples homes, getting
closer to their houses not having to rely on living near a main artery of public transport
does open things up a lot. – And Anthony, what does the data tell us about how peoples movement is changing? Does it differ from what people say about how they would like to move now and what they project for the future? – Yeah, absolutely. I think when ride sharing
first came along people thought of it as a replacement for
a taxi and that was it, and it is in some ways but
actually I think ride sharing isn’t necessarily just a
replacement for a taxi, its replacement for owning
a vehicle all together. And the actual pool of
people now with the speed and convenience and price of ride sharing, people are taking ride
sharing or transport in ways that they wouldn’t have otherwise,
they’re using those trips more often to go to more places
and I’m an example of this. My wife and I, we have a child. We’ve only had one car in our household for the last four or five years. And we’ve found that we can use ride sharing services to fill in that gap. I also have an electric bike that I use to get to work and other places so I’m one of those geeky
guys with the green helmet, riding around but I find
that between those two things we’ve saved money, its more convenient, I don’t have to worry about parking, I can have a few drinks when I’m out. So I think that peoples
transport patterns and behaviors are changing as things get easier, as they get more simple
and cost effective, They’re traveling more and
they’re taking advantage of the services in their City. – What is the future
of on demand services? Are they gonna end up ride
sharing the ride sharing services like UberPOOL, as you mentioned? I mean, sharing vehicles
like GoGet or DriveMyCar, or are we just simply going to do away with cars altogether and
jump into smart buses? – Well it’s a good question. (all three of them laugh) I guess the on demand
services that we operate, we certainly saw that
social inclusion aspect and we find that with people, it gets them closer to
using public transport. So I think in the future
more and more you’ll see an integration of on
demand and mass transit transport solutions operating. To provide that end to
end journey to people and prevent them from taking
their individual cars, but more using shared mobility services for their end to end
journey, moving forward. – I always sort of think of this as like 1994 of the internet. There’s a lot of potential, a lot of hype, a lot of conversation, we don’t really know
what’s gonna take off, who’s gonna be Altervista?
Who’s gonna be Ask Jeeves? Who’s gonna be the Google that sort of dominates in the future? But either way we know that
this is past the tipping point, it’s gonna happen, in one way or another. Autonomous driving, better
safety, ride sharing. All of this is already
past that tipping point, now it’s about seeing what
do those trends mean for us? and which companies thrive
in that new environment? – Well I imagine there
must be quite a large area of opportunity for startups in
the on demand world as well. – Yeah, absolutely. I
think there absolutely is. I think there’s opportunities
for disruption here. I mean there’s obviously some
big players in the market, and we’ve mentioned some of them earlier. But there’s a lot of niche areas that different types of technology and organizations can fit in to. We’ve seen, atleast here in Sydney, all of the various bike
sharing, electric bike sharing, electric scooter sort of
companies sort of coming along. I think things like that
are gonna keep on evolving, and startups have a real
opportunity to grab a stake in this ’cause it is such a new industry. – We talk about AI, we talk
about the robot revolution, people worry about losing their jobs. What happens to all of the
drivers in this situation? New jobs for drivers. (all three laugh) – I think it was from
the US that, you know, driving is the job that is most common. All of the trucks, buses,
taxis, individuals as well. Our Cities are built around
cars and housing cars and transporting cars and Clearways. I think once we start to
see the air cleaning up, less people dying, you know, there’s gonna be new
jobs for those people. It could be tending to the green grasses that we have now in the city
instead of highways and byways. So I think it’s a net positive, but with anything like this
there’s gonna be disruption as we get there and not everyone
is gonna be a short term winner but I think we’ll
all be a long term winner. – Well it turns out Australia
may be the perfect place to trial new mobility as a service option. Our Reporter, Sara Isakka, took a sneak peek at what’s happening. (upbeat music) – These days we’re all familiar
with the term “ride sharing” Ubers, Olas, taxis, buses, any kind of group transport really. Well now there’s a new
kind of ride sharing and its making transport across the water readily available to anyone, anytime. I’m on my way to meet with the people behind the new App, AHOY. And get an insight from the passenger who’s been giving it a go. (upbeat music) – AHOY came about when we were
looking at our little boats that were already running
around Sydney Harbor, and we were thinking how can we connect people more easily to these? It was that little
moment where we thought, there’s got to be a
technological solution to this. We thought about the Uber
App and how that works and we thought, well,
we can connect people, by an App, by technology to the boat. – [Sara] For my friend Adam,
this kind of personalized service accessed via his phone, is something that could open up a world of possibility to how
he gets around each day. – As a commuter with public transport, AHOY would be something I could
definitely see myself using. I think its an absolutely incredible way for anyone to access the harbor and definitely a step
in the right direction in terms of utilizing technology
to its full potential. – When a passenger wants to book with AHOY they open up AHOY, they type
the wharf they’re coming from, they select the wharf they wanna go to, and then they confirm the booking. The Captain of the ship
gets a notification to tell them that they need
to go pick the passenger up and the passenger gets
told if they’ve accepted. – I’ve just ordered a
ferry via the AHOY App and it’s gonna be here in a few minutes, which is incredible. – The AHOY App has GPS,
which allows the customer to track exactly where the boat is and it allows us to
know how many passengers are on the wharf ready for pickup. – The idea of on demand, actually reduces congestion across the City. What we’re looking to do is to use small vessels more frequently. What it will do is create a
network of boats being used as and when they’re needed
so it will actually work to help to reduce congestion
across the harbor. – Currently with scheduled
timetable services it’s difficult to know
whether there is a demand for certain times during the day. So the App is a great tool in allowing us to go directly to the customer
and make a more efficient service for them and for us as well. – People will be able to
come down, use an Opal card, get a ferry when they want
to where they wanna go. In the future, that will extend out to being able to transport
right across the network, on demand, from end to end.
True mobility as a service. – The AHOY App is taking
ride sharing onto our waters making our City
transportation more flexible, accessible and convenient for everyone. I’m not sure where the ride
sharing evolution will go, but if its making more
people move, I’m all aboard. (upbeat music) (computer beeps and screeches) – So it seems like the
future of personal transport might be less about Cities full of Segways and more about getting the
transport that we need on demand. But it might not all be Uber
and Lyft or public transport, it may land somewhere in between. Ride Austin for example
is a not for profit, run by the City of Austin
which charges two dollars off of the top and the driver keeps the entire fair including tip. Could it be that the
disrupters get disrupted? – I hope so. (all three of them laugh) I’m sure they will, it’s
like any piece of technology, new players come in, they’re faster, they’re more agile, they
can make a difference, they can get in the way
and shift things up. – Yeah. I think it’s difficult to know. The market has already been disrupted, so I think the importance is
to look at what people need, what’s their mobility trends,
what they’re looking for and depending on that
making sure that you adapt so the there are different
options to what their needs are. – There’s definitely a
case where these companies are trying to set up walls
and motes around them. One of the challenges with ride sharing is you need a lot of drivers
and you need a lot of passengers and you need to keep
those things in equilibrium. And so you might offer discounts
to passengers to encourage more of them or extra pay
to drivers to encourage more of them. Trying to figure
out that balance is tricky. So for a new starter coming
along it’s not simple. There is a barrier to entry.
Obviously, its possible and it’s gonna keep on happening
but I wouldn’t wanna start a ride sharing company right now. I don’t think there’s many margins in it, it is very competitive. But there’s going to be
other pieces of technology, other areas around the
side that will absolutely get snapped up by disrupters. – So, Anthony, right now,
One car and an electric bike Is that right? – That’s right, yep. – How will you be traveling in 2030? – I don’t think I’ll have a car. My daughter is one year
old and I thought I dunno if she’s ever gonna learn to drive. In fact, I hope she never learns to drive because technology’s gotten
to the point where a safe, electric car will pick
her up wherever she wants, I’ll be able to track on
an App that she’s safe and she’s fine and sticking
to the speed limit. I think I won’t own a car but
I will be doing a lot more transport. I’ll be living
further from the city, but able to commute in, sleep
in the car on the way in. I’m excited about this future,
I think its gonna be awesome. – What about you, Ségolène? – I’ve got two kids and
they asked me the other day, ” How long does it take to
do your driving lessons?” And I said “well you
probably won’t need one”, so they were quite relieved for that. But I think living in a
more livable environment and sustainable through electric vehicles and not owning a car
will probably be a good prospective for the future. – Hover board 100% of the time. (Ségolène and Anthony laugh ) So the future of transport
may be transport companies that reflect their uses. If
your customers care about cost, ethics, the planet and helping
others have fair access to mobility then you should too and that just might be
your competitive edge. That’s all we have time
for so thank you so much to Ségolène and Anthony and
thanks to you for watching. I’m Stephanie Bendixsen and
until next time, keep on moving. (techno music)
(audience clapping)

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