“Not Much To See”: How the Blind Enjoy Movies

“Not Much To See”: How the Blind Enjoy Movies


Edison:
I LOVE A GOOD STORY. I ALWAYS HAVE,
EVER SINCE I WAS A CHILD. Hudson: MY HUSBAND,
ON OUR FIRST DATE, WE WENT TO GO SEE “ALADDIN.” HE TOOK HER
UP ON THE MAGIC CARPET, AND IT WAS A WHOLE NEW WORLD
TOGETHER. Garcia: WHEN ROBIN HOOD
SHOT HIS LAST ARROW AND IT WENT UNDER THE SEATS
AND IT HIT THE BULL’S-EYE. Edison: THE ORIGINAL
“WILLY WONKA” WITH GENE WILDER, THEY ARE FLOATING
AROUND THIS ROOM. THE GRANDFATHER STARTED TO BURP, AND THAT GOT THE STUFF
OUT OF HIS SYSTEM. AND SO THEY WERE JUST BURPING TO GET THEIR WAY DOWN
OFF THE CEILING. PEOPLE ALWAYS ASK ME, “HOW CAN YOU SEE A MOVIE
IF YOU CAN’T SEE? YOU CAN’T EVEN ENJOY MOVIES
‘CAUSE YOU CAN’T SEE THEM.” AND I DON’T AGREE WITH THAT
AT ALL ‘CAUSE THERE’S REALLY NOT MUCH
TO SEE. Hudson: I ACTUALLY HAD
A REAL-LIFE INCIDENT WHERE I WAS WITH MY GUIDE DOG. AND AS WE WALKED IN AND
IT’S DARK, SOMEBODY YELLS OUT, “WHAT ARE YOU TAKING THE DOG
IN THERE FOR? BLIND PEOPLE
DON’T GO TO THE MOVES.” AND I WAS SO UPSET BECAUSE
I DIDN’T KNOW WHO SAID IT, AND I JUST YELLED OUT, “I AM THE BLIND PERSON
GOING TO THE MOVIES.” Garcia: BLIND PEOPLE SAY
THE SAME THINGS, YOU KNOW, “WATCHING TV”
OR “WATCHING MOVIES.” Edison:
IT’S PART OF THE LEXICON. SO WHAT I DO
IS I JUST LISTEN TO IT. AND I LISTEN TO THE STORY. I LISTEN TO THE ACTING,
THE CHARACTERS, HOW WELL IT’S WRITTEN, THE SOUNDS, THE MUSIC,
ALL THAT OTHER STUFF. AND IT’S JUST THE SAME
EXPERIENCE WITHOUT THE PICTURE. Hudson:
THE WAY I WATCH MOVIES IS, YOU KNOW,
JUST LIKE EVERYBODY ELSE EXCEPT I’LL TEND TO TRY
TO GO TO MOVIE THEATERS THAT HAVE A DVS,
THE DESCRIPTIVE VIDEO SERVICE. Sohl: AUDIO DESCRIPTION
IS A NARRATION TRACK THAT’S DESIGNED TO FIT
IN THE NATURAL PAUSES BETWEEN THE LINES OF DIALOGUE
IN A FILM THAT DESCRIBES THE KEY
VISUAL ELEMENTS OF THE MOVIE — THE SET, THE COSTUME, LOCATION,
FACIAL EXPRESSIONS, ET CETERA. THE LEVEL OF DETAIL THAT
WE GO INTO IN AUDIO DESCRIPTION A LOT OF TIMES IS DETERMINED
BY HOW MUCH DIALOGUE THERE IS. IN THE MOVIE THEATER, YOU WILL
HEAR THE MOVIE SOUNDTRACK JUST THROUGH
THE THEATER SPEAKERS, AND YOU WILL HEAR
THE AUDIO DESCRIPTION THROUGH A SPECIALIZED SET
OF HEADPHONES. [ DRAMATIC MUSIC PLAYS ] Indy: ADIóS, SATIPO. Narrator:
HE GLANCES UP AGAIN. A HUGE,
PERFECTLY ROUNDED BOULDER COMES ROLLING DOWN FROM
THE SLOPED WALLS BEHIND HIM. THE AMERICAN TAKES OFF RUNNING. THE BOULDER RELENTLESSLY
ROLLS AFTER HIM, OBLITERATING EVERYTHING
IN ITS PATH. Edison:
BIG THEATER SOUND — THAT’S THE THING I LIKE
ABOUT THE THEATER IS THE BIG GIANT SOUND
THAT THEY GET. THERE WAS A FILM
CALLED “THE GREY,” AND THERE WAS A LOT OF RAIN
AND WIND IN THAT. AND THEY USED THE SURROUND SOUND
BEAUTIFULLY IN THAT FILM ‘CAUSE, LIKE, IT FELT LIKE I WAS OUTSIDE WITH THOSE GUYS
IN THE RAIN. IT WAS TREMENDOUS. Hudson:
GOLLUM IN “LORD OF THE RINGS” — JUST HIS VOICE,
I COULD TELL HOW HE WAS ACTING OR WHAT, YOU KNOW,
HE WOULD LOOK LIKE. Garcia: ALL OF
THE “HARRY POTTER” MOVIES, THEY HAD SOME PRETTY COOL
SOUND EFFECTS FOR THE MAGIC, HEARING THE SPELL, AND THE
DESCRIPTIVE VIDEO PERSON SAYS, “SO-AND-SO IS THROWN BACKWARDS
BY THE SPELL.” Hudson: TO BE THERE
AND SIT WITH EVERYONE ELSE AND WHEN YODA PULLED OUT HIS
LIGHT SABER FOR THE FIRST TIME, I DIDN’T EVEN NEED TO SEE IT. I KNEW WHAT WAS GOING ON BECAUSE OF WHAT EVERYBODY ELSE
WAS FEELING AND CHEERING. Edison: I HAD HEARD A LOT
OF PEOPLE IN MY LIFE — “YOU’VE GOT TO SEE
‘THE MATRIX,’ MAN. YOU’VE GOT TO SEE THIS.” AND I PUT IT ON SEVERAL TIMES
AND JUST COULDN’T FOLLOW IT. THEN I GOT AN AUDIO-DESCRIBED
VERSION OF IT FOR CHRISTMAS ONE YEAR. AND I WAS ABLE
TO FOLLOW IT PERFECTLY AND I UNDERSTOOD
EVERY SINGLE DETAIL, EVERYTHING THAT WAS GOING ON
IN THE FILM. Sohl: AUDIO DESCRIPTION
HAS A WAYS TO GO IN TERMS OF RECOGNITION. Hudson: IT’S NOT AS ACCESSIBLE
AS YOU WOULD THINK. AND IT’S ACTUALLY
PRETTY FRUSTRATING. Garcia: WE HAVE TO GO
TO A SPECIFIC MOVIE THEATER. AND EVEN IN THOSE, CERTAIN
THEATERS WON’T HAVE THEM. Hudson: THERE USED TO BE
A LOT MORE THEATERS THAT HAD DESCRIPTIVE VIDEO. BUT I THINK WITH, YOU KNOW,
THE 3-D AND THE DIGITAL, INSTEAD OF BEING ABLE
TO HAVE IT ALL, THEY PICKED ONE, AND AUDIO DESCRIPTION
GETS BUMPED OFF. Sohl:
HAVING ACCESS TO MOVIES IS REALLY BEING PART
OF THE CULTURAL CONVERSATION. Hudson: MOVIES TAKE YOU
AWAY FROM REALITY. Edison:
MOVES ARE FOR EVERYBODY. JUST BECAUSE SOMEBODY CAN’T SEE DOESN’T MEAN
THEY CAN’T ENJOY A FILM. BELIEVE ME. Hudson:
I DON’T WANT TO BE LEFT OUT. I DON’T WANT TO BE LEFT BEHIND. Edison:
I ENJOY THEM JUST LIKE YOU DO. AND I LOVE THEM AND I ALWAYS
HAVE AND I ALWAYS WILL.

Only registered users can comment.

  1. Amazing video. I want to watch a movie with audio description and my eyes closed just to experience it. 

  2. Beautiful! I didn't know audio description existed in movie theaters – never paid attention, but it make sense that it's such an enveloping experience for blind people. All filmmakers know how important sound is, but I've never watched a film with my eyes closed (with or without the audio description). Now I really want to try it – to better understand sound, and to be a better writer. Thanks for this!

  3. I listen to talks every day (usually educational) on my iPod whilst at work or walking somewhere, they don't need visuals at all to be enjoyed!.. But then again, Tommy Edison said he doesn't like wearing headphones/earphones.

  4. This is a fantastic video! However there are no captions and therefore is not accessible for individuals who are deaf and hard of hearing. It is important that if The Academy is going to discuss issues pertaining to people with disabilities that the video be accessible for all individuals. I wonder how Marlee Matlin, the only deaf performer to win the Academy Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role suppose to enjoy this video? How is Tyrone Giordano, Russell Harvard, or any of the other actors and actresses working in the film industry suppose to truly appreciate this video? Also I would like to mention that many of the issues facing blind individuals – mentioned in this video – also pertain to deaf and hard of hearing individuals. For example most deaf or hard of hearing individuals like blind individuals with video description have to find a specific theatre that offers captioned movies. You may see that there are "automatic captions" on this video, unfortunately the automatic captions provided are not enough. For example Tommy says "cuz" and the caption says "cousin". It is not accurate, and also doesn't clarify who is speaking. 

    Just like in the video when Melissa Hudson says "I don't want to be left out. I don't want to be left behind." I look forward to viewing and sharing this video as soon as captions are added.

    @TommyEdisonXP  #captionthis   #accessibility    @Oscars 

  5. @Oscars – A friend of mine recognized the inaccessibility of this video to deaf and hard of hearing individuals and went ahead and typed up a transcript so that the video could be shared with the deaf and hard of hearing community. I have copy and pasted the transcript below, however it is my hope however that you will take into serious consideration adding closed captions to any more of the videos you produce on your YouTube channel.

    I would also like to take a moment to thank you for this fantastic video! It really does an amazing job at providing a different perspective on how different groups of diverse individuals enjoy movies!

    Thank you again, 

    [music]
    [new music]
    Tommy Edison: I love a good story. I always have, ever since I was a child.
    Second person: My husband, on our first date, we went to go see Aladdin. He took her up on a magic carpet and it was a whole new world together.
    Third person: When Robin Hood shot his last arrow and it went under the seats and it hit the Bull's Eye. 
    Tommy Edison: The original Willy Wonka with Gene Wilder. These are floating around this room. Grandfather started to burp and that got the stuff out of his system, and so they were just burping to get their way down off the ceiling. People always ask me "how can you see a movie if you can't see?" You can't even enjoy movies 'cause you can't see them. And I don't agree with that at all, 'cause there's not really much to see.
    [music]
    Person 2: I actually had a real-life incident where I was with my guide dog, and as we walked in, and it's dark, somebody yells out: "What are you taking the dog in there for? Blind people don't go to the movies!" And I was so upset because I didn't know who said that, and I just yelled out "I am the blind person going to the movies!"
    Person 3: Blind people say the same things you know, watching TV or watching movies. 
    Tommy: It's just part of the lexicon, so what I do is I just listen to it, and I listen to the story, and I listen to the acting, the characters, how well it's written, the sounds, the music, all that other stuff. And it's just the same experience without the picture.
    Person 2: The way I watch movies is, you know, just like everybody else, except I'll tend to try to go to movie theaters that have DVS–descriptive video service. 
    Person 4: Audio description is a narration track that's designed to fit in the natural pauses between the lines of dialogue in a film that describes the key visual elements of a movie: the set, the costume location, facial expressions, etc. The level of detail that we go into in an audio description a lot of times is determined by how much dialogue there is. In the movie theater you will hear the movie soundtrack just thorough the theater speakers, and you will hear the audio description through a specialized set of headphones. 
    [movie clip]
    [music and soundtrack noises of pouring liquid]
    Dialogue: I think I'll still [inaudible]
    Narration: He glances up again, a huge, perfectly rounded boulder comes rolling down from the sloped walls behind him. The American takes off running. The boulder relentlessly rolls after him, obliterating everything in its path. [sound of boulder] 
    [end clip]
    Tommy: Big theater sound? That's the thing I like about the theater is the big giant sound that they get. There was a film called "The Grey" and there was a lot of rain and wind in that, and they used the surround sound beautifully in that film. Like it felt like I was outside with those guys in the rain–it was tremendous!
    Person 2: Gollum in Lord of The Rings. Just his voice I could tell how he was acting or what, you know, he would look like.
    Person 3: All of the Harry Potter movies–they had some pretty cool sound effects for the magic. Hearing the spell and the descriptive video person says "so-and-so was thrown backwards by the spell".
    Person 2: To be there and sit with everyone else and when Yoda pulled out his lightsaber for the first time, I didn't even need to see it. I knew what was going on because of what everybody else was feeling and cheering.
    Tommy: So I had heard a lot of people in my life–"You gotta see the Matrix, man. You gotta see this." And I put it on several times and just couldn't follow it. Then I got an audio-described version of it for Christmas and I was able to follow it perfectly and I understood every single detail! Everything that was going on in the film. 
    Person 4: Audio description has a ways to go, in terms of recognition.
    Person 2: It's not as accessible as you would think and it's actually pretty frustrating.
    Person 3: We have to go to a specific movie theater and even in those, just certain theaters won't have them.
    Person 2: There used to be a lot more theaters that had descriptive video but I think with, y'know, the 3D and the digital, instead of being able to have it all, they picked one, and audio description gets bumped off. 
    Person 4: Having access to movies is really being part of the cultural conversation. 
    Person 2: Movies take you away from reality. 
    Tommy: Movies are for everybody. Just because somebody can't see doesn't mean they can't enjoy a film–believe me.
    Person 2: I don't want to be left out. I don't want to be left behind. 
    Tommy: I enjoy them just like you do. And I love them and I always have and I always will. 
    [closing music]

    @TommyEdisonXP  #closedcaptions   #captionthis  

  6. Wow, i really loved that video, it shows just how much blind people also enjoy movies, i've always wondered how exactly they understood what is happening in the movie, but now i understand more, thanks for the video and thanks to TommyEdisson for bringing me here XD

  7. Amazing! In movies based on book also would be great, because they already know how the characters look and whats happening

    OT/ the audio describer guy look like a bald Eminem XD

  8. do blind people get discount since you don't get the full experience ? not trying to be rude just curious.

  9. This is great. It's like listening to an audio book that describes what the characters are doing and the scenery and at the same time hearing the movie.

  10. Movie studios should release the audio description track to a website that can be downloaded before hand. Then they wouldn't need to find a specific theatre.

  11. I always wanted to try to "listen" to a movie just like an audio book to see what it feels like.

  12. "blind people don't go to the movies" Well yeah I don't go, used to go with my mom who has a horrible taste for films (only wanted to watch those cheesy romcom stories or cartoons), so yeah I don't go.
    but dude! Have you ever watched Dancer in the Dark? Selma loved the musicals!

    Never had access to descriptive audio before but it seems to be the coolest way to "watch" movies, ever, blind or not.

  13. I think it is so cool that they are still able to enjoy these movies! But there is still a part of me that wants them to be able to visually see some of the special effects and other stuff with their eyes.

  14. I'm not blind however I listen to movies many times. I treat it as a radioshow, as long as the movie was a great soundscape, acting and actual dialogue.

  15. The first time I heard about Audio Description was by accident when I was watching Resident Evil: Afterlife I saw this audio feature on the blu ray copy of the movie so curious I click on it and it begin to describe what was happening. THat's how I first learn about the feature

  16. it takes a special kind of asshole to yell "blind people don't go to cinema" – should of kicked them out and got it in their skull that everyone has a right to do as they please without ignorant fucks trying to wave their flacid dicks to look "cool" (and seriously, who looks remotely "cool" insulting blind people?)

  17. My brother is blind and his favorite movie is finding Dory he loves the rain sounds ,train,and cars honking somepoeple say how is it to how a blind bother and it's nice he is awesome he grate if I can say 100 words about him I wound . One day we where walk and some said he blind he noes that he blind but he does not like hearning. And you are awesome I wish I can be you.My bother is name Tyler he was born blind we go to school at rossovil grade school god bliss you

  18. The audio description actually sounds better than the movie lol its like an audiobook. I wish it were available to anyone for any movie. Then people could just listen to movies on the commute drive to work lol

  19. Blind people can watch movies but will mess MANY THINGS movies are not only about speaking and sounds but visuals is a huge important part. They can lie to themselve to feel better but the truth is they miss many things. No one here would love to be blind here so far. That being said im very happy those person can enjoy movies but they lie to themselve if they think they dont miss a lot they miss a lot lot lot.

  20. I'm not blind and I don't really know why I do this but when my mom puts on a tv series I just sit and listen sometimes. Like I'll sit behind the laptop while she's watching it、and honestly it's just as enjoyable for some reason.

  21. Many people with low vision find the use of filters help. Making the movie/show black and white or even monochrome can sometimes help them make out what’s on the screen.

    Tutorial here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-A7IBryoIwg

  22. This is important guys. I’m actually legally blind (not completely blind). When my school takes us to plays or movies and we are sitting near the back, most of us get audio description devices to understand it better. People with vision problems can do lots of things. We can go on roller coasters, write an essay, even build things (we can play video games as well. If you look at my channel I can prove it to you). We just need some extra help, so if you see a person that has a cane or any disability ask if they need help. Also be patient with us. We are trying our hardest. Also, try not to stare, it’s ok to ask. I know some people get offended but still ask and if they are rude just walk away. Try and be careful around schools for people with special needs. Especially when driving. (I know because the road near my school is very hectic). Thank you for reading this. Sorry that it’s so long. XD

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *