TOP 10 Giant Waterfalls Worth Taking a Picture The Biggest and Powerful | AmazingTOP10Facts

TOP 10 Giant Waterfalls Worth Taking a Picture The Biggest and Powerful | AmazingTOP10Facts


Anyone who’s seen a waterfall up close will agree that their majesty is almost indescribable. If even a small fall can inspire these feelings, imagine what it’s like to look at the world’s largest waterfall. Niagara Falls span the border between the United States and Canada. Though remarkably wide, Niagara is not the tallest or highest-volume waterfall in the world. When Annie Taylor took a wild ride over Niagara Falls in a barrel back in 1901, she was the first in a long line of daredevils to do so – not all of them as successful. With a vertical drop of more than 188 feet and a volume of water reaching 225,000 cubic feet per second, Niagara Falls probably seemed like the most powerful waterfall in the world at the time, but it’s dwarfed in comparison to some of the world’s raging rapids. While there’s plenty of debate on which is the biggest falls out there, one thing’s for sure: Whether you want to take a tumble off or just take a picture of some of the world’s biggest and powerful waterfalls, check our top 10 list, they are definitely worth taking a picture. Plunging from the River Sharavathi down 829 feet, it’s one of the most impressive falls in the world in terms of combined height and volume. The falls stand 829 feet tall and can stretch to almost 2,000 feet in width at peak flow. This translates into Jog Falls being one of the most powerful waterfalls on the planet, and if it was a permanently free-flowing waterfall would most likely elevate its rating such to be one of the top five on earth. Under normal conditions the falls divide into four distinct segments- each given a name thought to reflect its character; the Raja, the Roarer, the Rocket, and the Rani. The falls are major attractions for tourists. Pass by India’s Jog Falls at the wrong time of year and you may not even notice the small trickle of water, but stop by during monsoon season and you’ll see why it’s a major tourist attraction. San Rafael is one of the most beautiful waterfalls in Ecuador. It has a height of 150 meters, and is located at the foot of the active Reventador volcano. At the moment, the highest waterfall in Ecuador is located on the territory of Sumako Nature Reserve, whose distinctive features include incredible lush tropical vegetation. As a rule, all excursions to the reserve start from the city of Quito. The San Rafael waterfall is almost 200 km from Quito. To see the wonderful natural attraction, you will walk through the jungle, you can admire incredibly beautiful tropical landscapes and see rare butterflies. In the immediate vicinity of the waterfall a convenient viewing platform was designed, from which one can make excellent photographs. Cascada de Ventisquero Colgante is a waterfall of relatively recent formation. The meltwaters of the Ventisquero Colgante (Hanging Glacier) plunge over a giant headwall formerly was covered by the glacier- which itself now sits at the top of the cliff slowly but steadily retreating backwards. The meltwaters freefall in one of two paths depending on how the ice above is directing its flow, then impacts on a huge slab of angled bedrock and skips the remaining distance to the valley floor, where it flows underneath what appears to be a permanent avalanche cone. The falls are visible and flowing year round but due to the abblation of avalanches at the base of the falls, as much as half of the falls can be covered by snow and ice during the late spring and early summer. Virginia Falls is a massive waterfall that slides down a long stretch of mighty rapids and short drops then splits around a massive 400 feet tall spire of lime stone known as Mason’s Rock. The south segment of the falls drops 294 feet to the river below, while the north segment slides steeply down to a bend, then falls about 170 feet to rejoin the south segment in the river below. The falls are frequently cited as being 317 feet in height, but the NRCanada Topographical Maps are clear in their height figure, 294 feet. At any rate, the falls aren’t compromised by a missing 23 feet of height. The falls are better than 800 feet in width and the face of the falls is spans nearly 4 acres in surface area. Sutherland Falls is a high volume waterfall of three steps in very quick succession along the Arthur River, which spills from a pair of sizable lakes carved into glacial basins high on a mountainside in New Zealand’s Fiordland National Park. The three drops of the falls stand 751 feet, 815 feet, and 338 feet tall respectively, occur in such quick succession that when viewed from the air the falls appear to be one long drop that impacts the bedrock in a few places. The Arthur River heads in a modest glacier which feeds into a small unnamed lake which then spills into Lake Quill in its own waterfall. Because of the volume of precipitation the region receives, the glacier sustains its mass fairly well and the lakes always provide a consistent flow over the falls and thus remains very consistent all year long. The waterfall is highly inaccessible, requiring a 4-day trek along the Milford Track (or a pricy flight) to see it. La Cataracta Gocta or Gocta Falls is a tall, moderate to high volume waterfall located in the upper Amazon basin in Peru. Although the waterfall had been well known to locals for centuries, its existence was not made known to the world until after an expedition made in 2002 by a German, Stefan Ziemendorff, with a group of Peruvian explorers. The falls drop a total of 2,531 feet in two leaps. The upper tier falls about 700 feet in a purely vertical fall, the lower drops about 1,770 feet in a nearly vertical drop into a huge amphitheater, with the remainder of the height made up between the two steps. Though the volume of the unnamed river the falls occur along can fluctuate greatly with the seasons, the falls can be considered one of the major waterfalls of South America and measure up as one of the best falls on the planet. The tallest waterfall in the world is Venezuela’s Angel Falls, which plunges 3,212 feet (979 meters). The falls descend over the edge of Auyán-Tepuí, which means Devil’s Mountain, a flat-topped elevated area of land with sheer cliff sides located in Canaima National Park in the Bolivar State of Venezuela. Remember the scene in Disney’s “Up” when the little house lands precariously on top of a rocky waterfall? We’re willing to bet it was modeled after Angel Falls, an otherworldly waterfall dropping straight out of the clouds from the summit of Auyan-tepuy in the highlands of Venezuela. It’s the highest waterfall in the world- 15 times higher than Niagara- but it’s tucked away in a jungle region so isolated, the only way to get there is by air. Victoria Falls is a 5,600-foot wide waterfall located on Zambezi River in Zimbabwe. The river falls roughly 344 feet into a gorge made up of lateral volcanic dikes, which were formed as the river eroded the rock and soil of its bed. The noise of Victoria Falls can be heard from a distance of 40 kilometers, while the spray and mist from the falling water is rising to a height of over 400 meters and can be seen from a distance of 50 kilometers, giving the appearance that smoke is rising out of a deep hole in the earth. This is where it gets its indigenous name, “The Smoke that Thunders”, and standing too close will definitely make your body shake. This fall is often mistakenly called the largest in the world, but it’s neither the highest nor the widest. What it does offer is 360 feet of cascading water stretching for a mile between Zimbabwe and Zambia, carving through a plateau- the same thing it’s been doing for some 2 million years. Kaieteur Falls is one of the most powerful waterfalls on the planet. The falls occur where the Potaro River plunges 741 feet off the edge of the Mazaruni-Potaro Shield into a long, broad isolated gorge. The volume of the Potaro River can vary substantially depending on the season, but the average volume of water flowing over the falls is somewhere around 23,000 cubic feet per second, making this a rare combination of a very tall waterfall on a high volume river. Hiking through Guyana’s rainforest, you’ll likely hear this powerful waterfall before you see it: With its massive volume and height, the combination makes it a serious contender for most powerful falls in the world. The mist, rainbows and rocky gorge don’t harm its allure either. Voted in as one of the Seven Natural Wonders of the World, Iguazu Falls is the largest waterfall system in the world. This system of 275 waterfalls pours from the Iguazu River between Brazil and Argentina. The falls drop a total of 269 feet along the Rio Iguazú, splitting into hundreds of individual falls. While the majority of the river plunges into the “Garganta del Diablo” (the Devil’s Throat), because the river sheets out over a broad area the crest of the falls is over 1.5 miles in length. This waterfall can vary greatly in volume, depending on how much rain has fallen. During the dry season the falls are noticeably affected by the lack of precipitation and can shrink down to a fraction of its usual size, but at other times it will spread to up to 9,500 feet wide. The Rio Iguazú also has been known to swell to great proportions during the rainy season when the volume of the falls has been recorded to increase as much as 8 times above its annual average.

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