UX & Movies – James Rampton

UX & Movies – James Rampton


I’m a UXer. I love movies. So let’s have some fun. I want to ask five
questions from five movies. I got bored one night watching
Family Guy and Star Trek, simultaneously, and I wanted
to ask you guys five questions. In a digital future do manual
controls still have a place? And this is from Star Trek. For some reason,
Gene Roddenberry loved really bad interfaces. I do not know why, but JJ
Abrams did a better job. He created manual interfaces. So Captain Sulu, in order
to accelerate the Starship Enterprise, decided to
press the control down. Now, we have digital
interfaces, they’re beautiful, why are we using this? Actually, that
picture kind of sucks. So I apologize. But you can see them
in the corner there. But again, it kind of asks
the bigger question, though, as to why we still
have manual controls? Now, there is some
intrinsic value in them. When you push on an
accelerator and you go fast or you push a button
and you go fast, there’s probably a
different experience. Your natural brain
connections will probably tell you that, ooh, if I press
the pedal harder, I go faster. That’s a good thing. Now if I just push a
button and go forward that’s not as exciting. Or if I release the
hatch and pull it down and I release four people
out of an escape hatch who go flying up
in space, that’s a lot more exciting
than just pushing go. So I wanted to ask the question
is there any intrinsic value in manual controls. The second question I had is are
voice command-based interfaces more effective when they
have a sense of humor? This is from Christopher
Nolan in Interstellar, which I realize is a boring–
no, actually not so boring, I actually loved it– 2
and 1/2 hour long movie. Now Cooper, who is Matthew
McConaughey’s character, says what is your
trust setting, TARS? And he says, lower
than yours, apparently. Now is there any
intrinsic value in making interface more humanoid? Is it more effective? Is there– Yes. Yes. I love that answer. I like this. Everybody good, plenty of
slaves for my robot colony. As TARS would like
to say while on Mars. Now, I don’t want to
give anything away, but I do know that
this character is a lot more reliable than
Matt Damon’s character. The third one is
when should we be using a 3D map versus a 2D map? I literally found dozens
of examples of this, ranging from Star
Wars to Star Trek. And I realize that’s
a very long range. There are differences
ladies and gentleman. They should never be confused. This is from Prometheus, though. So when you are
looking at a map, in a three dimensional
room, is it more effective? And now we are looking at
a two dimensional screen, is it more effective or not? Now from different movies,
obviously, two dimensional maybe is more portable. Who knows? In Guardians of the Galaxy
our friend their blow it up, and he kind of
walked through a map. But here we just have it as
a two dimensional interface. Thank you, Ridley Scott. It’s very charming. I don’t know. Is it more effective? You tell me. I do like, though, how you
could walk inside a map. That is very effective. And maybe give you problems
for challenging the bigger picture of things, because you
are looking inside the map. But has it enhanced
the experience? Is it portable? These are future questions. People get inspired by
movies all the time. The third question I want
to ask is color a necessity? Now, the next I’m
going to show you is– I realize some people
didn’t like it, but I did. I do like his bland acting,
so I apologize in advance. This is from The
Matrix Reloaded. Now, in Zion, which is the world
in the center of the world, they use, basically, avatars
to go into the Matrix and here– even though
they can make up anything, they don’t even have their own
technical requirements– they chose to do black and white. Why is that? Is it their ideal state? Who knows? Was it invented by people
who were colorblind and they’re just like,
ah, just fuck it? I don’t know. Is it more effective? You tell me. The fourth question
I want to ask is why are we going to
stop using keyboards? Now, I realize that the
next movie many of you probably did not see, but I did. I actually liked a lot. I’m a big fan of
Scarlett Johansson. So, obviously, my ideal
world is an operating system with her voice. Now, if you notice
in this movie, though, he stops
using a keyboard. Now, for people with
accessibility issues who cannot probably have– and
I can’t enunciate– this may be a terrifying future. But, for me, I just wanted
to ask the question. In the foreseeable future when
do we stop using keyboards? Literally, if you’ll actually
look at the entire movie there’s not a single keyboard. It’s actually kind
of a scary thought. But there is Scarlett
Johansson, so I don’t know. You choose the better future. So thank you so
much for listening. I love movies. So if you ever want to talk
about some more let me know. If you want to look me up
on Twitter, its @jrampton. Or just find me. I’m the tall, white, bald
guy in the back of the room. So thank you very much.

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